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"It’s been 20 years since Kids. What’s changed about youth culture?  People’s needs are still the same. The big difference is the way they socialize and this is filtered through technology. The way we communicate with each other, how fast things are, how noisy it is, and what this does to the syntax—that’s all changed.  The characters in Kids were all outsiders. They were all about trying to get lost and disappear. They were oblivion seekers trying to get away from everyone and everything. They lived on rooftops and slept out in the parks. Now it’s the opposite—everyone is trying to be found. Everyone wants to live in front of each other. We now have a public and performative culture, where it’s all about socializing with everyone and letting everyone know where you are every second of the day—people you don’t even know! That’s what I see, for the most part. Then it was about being private and doing things that were illegal and not letting anyone know. Now even criminals want to let people know where they are! One is not better or more interesting than the other; they’re just completely different. Kids was more of an insider’s story, told from the inside out. Spring Breakers is told from the outside in. It’s about the way things look and feel, and the menacing residue that drips from the candy-coated glossy, pop surfaces. Spring Breakers is more of a fever dream, a pop poem. It’s more like a painting, an impressionistic reinterpretation. It’s not the truth; it’s more like an emotion.”- Harmony Korine, in conversation with Humberto Leon
  1. "It’s been 20 years since Kids. What’s changed about youth culture?
    People’s needs are still the same. The big difference is the way they socialize and this is filtered through technology. The way we communicate with each other, how fast things are, how noisy it is, and what this does to the syntax—that’s all changed.

    The characters in Kids were all outsiders. They were all about trying to get lost and disappear. They were oblivion seekers trying to get away from everyone and everything. They lived on rooftops and slept out in the parks. Now it’s the opposite—everyone is trying to be found. Everyone wants to live in front of each other. We now have a public and performative culture, where it’s all about socializing with everyone and letting everyone know where you are every second of the day—people you don’t even know! That’s what I see, for the most part. Then it was about being private and doing things that were illegal and not letting anyone know. Now even criminals want to let people know where they are! One is not better or more interesting than the other; they’re just completely different.

    Kids was more of an insider’s story, told from the inside out. Spring Breakers is told from the outside in. It’s about the way things look and feel, and the menacing residue that drips from the candy-coated glossy, pop surfaces. Spring Breakers is more of a fever dream, a pop poem. It’s more like a painting, an impressionistic reinterpretation. It’s not the truth; it’s more like an emotion.”

    - Harmony Korine, in conversation with Humberto Leon

  1. 23 notesTimestamp: Friday 2013/03/15 19:15:44KidsSpring BreakersHarmony KorineHumberto Leon
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